Alloy Families

Stellite™ Alloys

Stellite™ Cobalt-based alloys are noted for their resistance to corrosion, erosion, and abrasion at elevated temperatures (up to 800ºC). There are more than 20 Stellite™ alloys in this family. 

A special Stellite™ alloy: Stellite™ 6B is a custom wrought (hot forged) material with outstanding resistance to most types of wear and is extremely resistant to seizing or galling. High temperatures have little effect on the toughness and dimensional stability of this alloy. 

Deloro™ & Nistelle™ Alloys

Deloro™ Nickel-based alloys exhibit excellent corrosion, abrasion, and wear-resistance (up to 600ºC), and have a wide melting range allowing them to be applied by the spray and fuse, and powder-weld processes. Nistelle™ Nickel-based castings are noted for their outstanding corrosion resistance and are offered in a full range of ASTM, AMS, and ACI specifications. 

Tribaloy™ Alloys

These Cobalt- and Nickel-based alloys feature a hard inter-metallic laves phase, dispersed in a tough matrix of eutectic or solid solution. Tribaloy™ alloys exhibit outstanding resistance to high-temperature wear, galling, and corrosion and are particularly suitable for use where lubrication is a problem. 

700 Series™ Alloys

This family of Cobalt-based alloys uses Chromium and Molybdenum as major alloying elements. These offer good wear resistance with superior corrosion resistance in reducing environments of hydrochloric, phosphoric, and napthanic acid. 

Additional Alloys

Stelcar™ and Super Stelcar™ alloys are composite alloys with varying percentages of carbide in Cobalt-and Nickel-based matrices. These hardfacing alloys are designed for extremely abrasive and erosive environments. Delcrome™ Iron-based alloys provide excellent wear resistance where heat and corrosion are not factors. 

TIG WELDING 

In TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas), also known as Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW), an arc is drawn between a nonconsumable tungsten electrode and the workpiece. The electrode, the arc, and the weld-pool are protected from the atmosphere with an inert shielding gas. The hardfacing material is in the form of a rod. Advantages of the TIG process include simple manual operation and good control of the welding arc. The process can also be mechanised, in which case a manipulator is used to move the workpiece in relation to the welding torch and the hardfacing rod or wire.

Welding rods used for TIG welding are also used for hardfacing with the oxy-acetylene welding process.

With the correct operation, a very low level of iron dilution can be achieved in the overlay.

Rod is available in these standard diameters:

  • 2,6 mm (special order)
  • 3,2 mm 
  • 4,0 mm 
  • 5,0 mm 
  • 6,4 mm 
  • 8,0 mm 

Manual Metal Arc (MMA) Weld Deposition

In this process, an arc is drawn between a coated consumable electrode and the workpiece. The metallic core is melted by the arc and is transferred to the weld pool as molten droplets. The electrode coating also melts to form a gas shield around the arc and the weld pool as well asa slag on the surface of the weld pool, thus protecting the cooling weld-pool from the atmosphere. The slag must be removed after each layer. MMA welding is still a widely used hardfacing process. Due to the low cost of the equipment, the low operating costs of the process, and the ease of transporting the equipment, this flexible process is ideally suited to repair work.

Electrodes are available in these standard diameters:

  • 2,6 mm (special order)
  • 3,2 mm 
  • 4,0 mm 
  • 5,0 mm 
  • 6,4 mm 

Electrodes are supplied in lengths of 350mm (14”) and are boxed in 5.0 kg boxes.

Depending upon the process parameters, the hardness of the welded deposit can vary from the values provided in the table above.

MIG Weld Deposition, Submerged Arc Welding

In these arc welding processes, consumable hardfacing wire is fed continuously from a spool through the welding torch into the arc, where it is melted and transferred to the workpiece In the case of MIG welding, also known as Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW), the weld pool is protected from the atmosphere by a stream of shielding gas. 

The MIG process is very flexible — it can be partially or fully mechanized and is suitable for a wide range of applications.Wire is also used as the hardfacing consumable in the Submerged Arc Welding (SAW) process. In this process, a mineral-based fluxing powder flows around the consumable wire and is melted by the arc. It forms a gaseous shield around the arc and also forms a slag on top of the weld pool, shielding the cooling weld pool from the atmosphere..

Cored Wires are available in these standard diameters:

  • 1,2mm— supplied in 15 kg spools
  • 1,6mm— supplied in 15 kg spools
  • 2,4mm— typically supplied in 25 kg spools (optionally in 15 kg spools)
  • 3,2mm(special order) — supplied in 15 kg spools

WELDING CONSUMABLES

Under construction. Check back soon for more details. 

 

Plasma Transferred Arc (PTA)

The PTA process is easily automated, providing a high degree of reproducibility of the weld overlays. In addition, because of the highly concentrated heat source, this process benefits from high powder utilization and can achieve a very low level of iron dilution in the overlay. Because the hardfacing materials are in powder form, it is possible to produce overlays from many different materials and combinations of materials with a wide range of hardness and other properties

PTA and laser hardfacing powders are available in these standard powder particle size ranges and custom sizes upon request.

  • WM 53–180μm
  • WE 63–180μm
  • E 53–150μm
  • G 38–125μm
  • HK 63–210μm
 

Laser Weld Deposition

The PTA process is easily automated, providing a high degree of reproducibility of the weld overlays. In addition, because of the highly concentrated heat source, this process benefits from high powder utilization and can achieve a very low level of iron dilution in the overlay. Because the hardfacing materials are in powder form, it is possible to produce overlays from many different materials and combinations of materials with a wide range ofhardness and other properties.

When overlaying with a laser, an optical arrangement is used to focus the laser beam on the workpiece and heat it. Simultaneously, hardfacing material in the form of powder or wire is introduced into the laser beam and melted. Due to the narrow heat-affected zone and the fast cooling rate, the heat input is low, thereby producing an almost stress-free overlay. Compared with other welding processes, for a given hardfacing alloy, the fast cooling rate of the laser process produces an overlay with a significantly higher hardness and finer microstructure.

 

Thermal Spraying Processes

  • Plasma Spraying
  • HVOF
  • Flame Spraying with Subsequent Fusing (Spray and Fuse)
  • Powder Welding